Pickled Pub Eggs

by Handjobs For The Home on April 20, 2011

Pickled food is one of the many pleasures in life. I love it. Simply put, if it’s pickled, I’ll try it. And if you think you’re not a fan of pickled foods, you may want to think about that again. Not everything pickled needs to be a cucumber. A few weeks ago I pickled asparagus. And today we’re crossing the pickling boundary even further, beyond fruits or vegetables. That’s right, kids, we’re making pickled eggs—perfect for egg week. And boy are they yummy.  This is a great recipe for all those leftover Easter eggs.

I remember having my first pickled egg at a favorite breakfast spot of mine in Brooklyn (named, rather appropriately, Egg). Upon first glance at the pink pickled eggs I thought no way—too weird. But I soon figured you can’t knock it until you try it. So I did, and instantly fell in love. My next pickled egg encounter was at another favorite restaurant of mine, Northern Food Spy Co., in New York’s East Village. But instead of a pleasant shade of pink, this egg was dark brown. Eeek! A brown egg? I came to find out it was made with malt vinegar, which makes for a really tasty when used for pickling. I loved this one even more.

So today I bring you my original recipe for Pickled Pub Eggs, made with malt vinegar. Looking though various recipes to come up with my own, the variations seemed endless. But all the pickled eggs I’ve had in the past have been quite simple, so I decided to go the basic route and follow my instincts.

Pickled Pub Eggs

What you’ll need:

6 hard boiled eggs, shells peeled off
1 tsp whole black peppercorns
1/8 tsp red pepper flakes
1/8 tsp salt
1 C. Malt vinegar

Place the eggs in a 1 pint canning jar. Any jar will do, since we’re not processing the eggs, but I used a mason jar because I had one handy. Then place the rest of your ingredients in the jar, close the lid tightly, and refrigerate for one week.

I’ve got a few more days until these eggs are ready for eating, but they’re already looking good. Stay tuned for the taste test next week!

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{ 18 comments… read them below or add one }

Marisa April 21, 2011 at 3:09 am

Those look fantastic, I love the idea of using the malt vinegar. One question though, did you mean pint jar? You wrote half-pint and it seems to me it would be hard to squeeze six eggs into a jar that size.

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Handjobs for the Home April 21, 2011 at 10:23 am

Thanks, Marisa! Yes, my mistake–it should say 1 pint. I think you’d have some really ugly looking eggs if you tried to squeeze 6 eggs into a half pint. Thanks for the catch.

PS. I adore your blog!

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Janis April 21, 2011 at 3:39 pm

How long will they keep after the week that it takes to pickle them?

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Handjobs for the Home April 21, 2011 at 4:02 pm

I would say a few weeks give or take. The high acidity level will keep them fresh for a while, but I wouldn’t plan on eating them 4 month down the road since they are not processed.

And thank you! I’m glad you found me :)

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Marisa April 21, 2011 at 3:13 pm

Aww, thanks! Your blog isn’t too shabby either! ;)

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Janis April 21, 2011 at 3:40 pm

I love this site………….

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Kathy April 21, 2011 at 3:45 pm

Thanks for the idea of using left over eggs from Easter. You know so many of those will be laying around. Jar washed and waiting!

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Handjobs for the Home April 21, 2011 at 4:03 pm

Eggcelent!

Ah bad joke!

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Elizabeth April 21, 2011 at 5:59 pm

If I don’t want to use the malt vinegar what do I substitute? Just
measure for measure cider vinegar, for example? Am out of malt vinegar…had years ago when we used to eat fish. Will not be going to grocers again till week after Easter.

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Handjobs for the Home April 21, 2011 at 6:17 pm

Elizabeth, you can use any vinegar you’d like. Champagne vinegar might be yummy. It can be done with just plain old white vinegar too if that’s what you’ve got on hand.

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MCC April 22, 2011 at 9:17 pm

I’m available for taste testing.

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Elizabeth April 22, 2011 at 9:38 pm

I am going to use the juice from pickled beets…I heard that will make the eggs pink. I have just put on an extra 6 eggs to cook, along with the ones I am cooking for dyeing.

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Annie Jones April 27, 2011 at 10:04 pm

Can’t wait to try these…just need to run out for some malt vinegar.

Found your blog via HGGTH’s Facebook page…but not sure how I found her. :/

Really like your blog and have already bookmarked several ideas.

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Handjobs for the Home April 27, 2011 at 11:53 pm

Malt vinegar makes all the difference.

Thanks so much, Annie!

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Elizabeth April 28, 2011 at 3:06 am

My Easter eggs are pickling…even with cooking extra only had 3 left-over so put in 1/2 pint jar with the juice from the pickled beets and the peppercorns and salt. Topped up with cider vinegar. Now, wait a week??

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Livia May 1, 2011 at 6:18 pm

So I found this recipe for pub eggs on the internet, printed it out, and made it this morning. Then I re-searched for it to link to the recipe, and I found several recipes all the same (and chose yours to link to because I was charmed by the domain name). Do you know where original attribution comes from?

I scrolled on further through your blog and saw that while your write up was different you were also using the clever hard boiled egg method that I first saw published on Coconut and Lime with no link back. Not that ther has to be attributions, but they’re nice for tracking how recipes propagate and change.

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Handjobs for the Home May 2, 2011 at 2:02 am

Hi Livia, the pickled pub eggs are a combination of a few recipes I had come across. Most pickled eggs follow a similar recipe, but I just added the things that I enjoy. As for the hard boiled eggs, I have used this method for many years–I don’t think its a stranger to anyone that might do a search in google. All of my recipes are original, or otherwise stated in the recipe posting. Thank you!

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Elizabeth July 9, 2011 at 7:11 pm

Another batch of pickled eggs starting today. You have started a new “like” for us. Thanks much.

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