Pickled Smokey Garlic

by Handjobs For The Home on November 28, 2011

What’s that you say? Pickled garlic, eh?

Yes, it’s true. We’re talking about my favorite pungent flavor bulbs today. Packed with ton of deliciousness and my go to pantry item for just about any dish that needs some lovin’. The bottom drawer of my fridge is always stocked full, ready to jump in the skillet at a moment’s notice.

So why not add some vinegar and spices to these lovelies and keep them on the shelf year round?

I’ll be the first to admit, when I first heard you could pickle garlic I thought, “Well, that’s cool but what in the hell would you do with it?” Upon a little reading on the interwebs, the answer is—pretty much anything.

When you pickle garlic you take out all of that bite and harshness from the cloves and turn it into something that is quite magical. So magical in fact, that you can actually pop them in your mouth like you would an olive. And no worries about bad breath, that’s also taken out in the pickling process (or so I’m told. I’d still be wary. Err on the side of caution—eat pickled garlic with friends.)

Pickled garlic also makes a great addition to a preserves plate, alongside some charcuterie, or stuffed in an olive. Add it to a Japanese stir fry, or drop in a few cloves when braising a warm winter roast. The options are really endless.

One word to the wise. I had a bunch of garlic on hand (2 lbs to be exact) and decided to peel them myself. Next time though, I’d head to the grocery store and buy the pre peeled stuff because it was definitely a pain in the ass. For those that feel adventurous and want to go the DIY route like myself, blanch the bulbs in boiling water for 2 minutes and then strain. The peels will practically slip right off.

Oh, and one more note. Pickled garlic has a tendency to turn blue when hanging out in your jars. Don’t be alarmed, it’s totally fine to eat, and just adds to the weirdness you’re about to create.

Pickled Smokey Garlic
Makes 3 pints

What You’ll Need:

2 lbs Garlic, peeled
4 C. Distilled White Vinegar
1/8 C. Cane Sugar
1 Tbsp Kosher Salt

Per Jar:

1 tsp Red Pepper Flakes
½ tsp Fennel Seed
¼ tsp Smoked Paprika

Bring vinegar, sugar, and salt to a boil in a non-reactive saucepan. In the meantime, pack the garlic cloves into hot jars with spices.

Once the brine is boiling, ladle brine into jars leaving ½ inch headspace, being sure to cover the cloves of garlic by at least ½ inch.

Place lids on and process in a hot water bath canner for 10 minutes. Pull out, and let rest on the counter for 12 hours. Check seals and store for up to 1 year.

Related posts:

Share

{ 8 comments… read them below or add one }

Jaime November 28, 2011 at 10:17 pm

This looks amazing. I can’t wait to try.

I just learned about this method for peeling garlic: http://youtu.be/0d3oc24fD-c wish I’d been able to share it before you went through all that!

Reply

Christian Harrison November 28, 2011 at 11:20 pm

I imagine that blanching also addresses some of the concerns vis a vis botulism … 

What I want to know are recipes with pickled garlic! :)

I’d also love to actually smoke the cloves, on the stove top — maybe with apple wood and then use apple cider vinegar. Hm … the ideas are flowing!

Reply

Aj November 29, 2011 at 11:20 am

Oooo love the idea of actually smoking garlic. Sounds fantastic, Christian!

Reply

Adrienne Audrey November 28, 2011 at 11:26 pm

Sounds yummy. I will have to try this!

Reply

Karen January 6, 2012 at 7:47 pm

Just made 3 half pints of these. They smell divine! I will be buying pre-peeled garlic at costco next time though. Peeling 6 heads was a pain! Can’t wait to try taste them.

Reply

Handjobs For The Home January 6, 2012 at 10:29 pm

Told ya! I’m with you, pre-peeled is definitely the way to go next time.

Reply

Annette September 23, 2012 at 5:00 pm

I’ve been making hot pickled garlic for years. and the secret if you want to have them stay white. is blanch them first. I use cold water, bring to a boil for 1 minute only, and rinse in hot water….. they have never turned blue or green..and they keep for 2 years at least. I’ve been buying my prepeeled garlic at Extra foods. $5.99 for a 5 pound jug. I will never grow it again.

Reply

patty January 16, 2013 at 2:00 am

i am trying to make my pickled garlic stay white in the jars …so far no luck ..i read your reply and was wondering if you put the garlic in the cold water before the boil and bring to a boil then boil for 1 minute or do you bring the cold water to a boil then add the garlic…one more question…rinse in hot water…not cold water ? and why
thank you
patty

Reply

Leave a Comment

{ 1 trackback }

Previous post:

Next post: